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Federal Magistrate Judge Garcia Resigns Abruptly in Laredo Texas and Everyone Went Quietly On About their Business

It is unclear whether Garcia gave prior notice to the court about his intentions to resign. LMT requested a copy of Garcia’s resignation letter, but the court declined to provide one or comment further as to the nature of the resignation.

Federal Magistrate Judge resigns in Laredo

Originally Published: 27 March, 2018 ; update by LIT; 22 Dec., 2019

U.S. Magistrate Judge Guillermo R. Garcia resigned from his position last week, according to a statement from the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas.

Garcia had served as magistrate judge in the Southern District of Texas’ Laredo division since May 21, 2010. He could not be reached for comment after the announcement was made.

“The (U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas) has begun the process necessary to fill the vacated magistrate judge position and to ensure that the Court continues to serve the people of South Texas,” read a March 22 statement sent to Laredo Morning Times.

It is unclear whether Garcia gave prior notice to the court about his intentions to resign.

LMT requested a copy of Garcia’s resignation letter, but the court declined to provide one or comment further as to the nature of the resignation.

Garcia’s resignation came a week after Senior U.S. District Judge George P. Kazen retired.

G. Garcia is now employed as an Attorney for KMP, Laredo

Guillermo was born and raised in Laredo, Texas. In 1998 upon completion of law school and passing the Texas State Bar Exam, he returned to Laredo to begin the practice of law.

He became an Assistant Federal Public Defender from 1999 to 2002 and then returned to the private practice for eight years.

Most recently, he served as United States Magistrate Judge, for the Southern District of Texas, Laredo Division from 2010 to 2018.

He is pleased to once again serve the community in the private practice of law in the areas of Criminal Law, (State & Federal), Civil Litigation, Employment Law, School Law, Probate and Appellate Advocacy (State & Federal).

In other court-related activity, U.S. Magistrate Judge J. Scott Hacker requested a transfer to the Southern District of Texas’ McAllen division at the beginning of the year, citing personal reasons.

Hacker’s position is also in the process of being filled, so Laredo will still have three magistrate judges, according to court officials. A person has been chosen to replace Hacker and is undergoing an FBI background investigation. Court officials said the person being considered for the position will not be identified until the investigation is complete, which could take six to eight weeks.

Laredo’s federal courthouse is currently down to three judges: U.S. District Judges Diana Saldaña and Marina Garcia Marmolejo and U.S. Magistrate Judge Diana Song Quiroga.

Kazen was hearing cases as a senior judge, so his departure doesn’t open a district judge vacancy in the court.

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Federal Magistrate Judge Garcia Resigns Abruptly in Laredo Texas and Everyone Went Quietly On About their Business
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