Judges

Dawn Gentry Has Her Black Robe Removed by Order of the Judicial Committee and the Kentucky Supreme Court Affirms

Gentry’s 12 misconduct charges accuse her of using sex, coercion and retaliation as tools in her judgeship. She was suspended with pay – and even faced an impeachment inquiry from Kentucky lawmakers over the allegations.

Judge Dawn Gentry: Kentucky Supreme Court upholds judge’s removal

Originally Published: Dec. 17, 2020 | Republished by LIT: Jan 2, 2021

Kenton County Family Court Judge Dawn Gentry testifies in her hearing with the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission at the Campbell County Courthouse in Newport, Kentucky on Monday, August 10, 2020.

Gentry’s 12 misconduct charges accuse her of using sex, coercion and retaliation as tools in her judgeship. She was suspended – with pay – and even faced an impeachment inquiry from Kentucky lawmakers over the allegations.

Dawn Gentry has officially lost her job.

The Kentucky Supreme Court upheld the removal of Kenton County Family Court Judge Dawn Gentry on Thursday, according to court documents.

Gentry and her attorneys could not be immediately reached for comment.

It’s been about a year since Gentry’s misconduct case became public. She was accused of using personal relationships, coercion, and retaliation as tools in her judgeship. The case consumed the region as the now-former judge faced a pandemic-derailed impeachment inquiry and a week-long misconduct hearing.

The Judicial Conduct Commission voted to remove the judge from the bench in August after a misconduct hearing in Northern Kentucky. She appealed the case to the supreme court.

In her appeal, the now-former judge argued there were procedural errors with the commission’s case, such as sufficient proof and evidentiary matters. She also argued the commission’s punishment was not reasonable.

She asked the court to: reverse the commission’s decision and to order a new hearing to “remedy the errors present.”

The Kentucky Supreme Court did not agree.

Gentry has 20 days to file a petition for rehearing. If nothing is received, the opinion will become final after 21 days, according to a spokesperson from the Administrative Office of the Courts.

What happened?

Gentry became a judge in 2016 when former Republican Gov. Matt Bevin picked her to fill a vacancy. She was elected to an eight-year term in 2018. She made $136,900 a year.

An Enquirer report last year revealed the judge was under investigation. Attorneys at the time told The Enquirer Gentry retaliated against those who denied her sex and campaign donations by delaying cases that involved abused children. While the commission did not criticize Gentry’s final rulings, it said her misconduct was too great for her to keep her job.

More:Judge Dawn Gentry case: Who is Katherine Schulz, Stephen Penrose, others involved in case

“This case does not involve one or two isolated occurrences, but instead involves a pattern of misconduct and repeated exercise of extremely poor judgment – on and off the Bench – by the Respondent that continued for over a year, including after Respondent was informed that a complaint was filed with the Commission against her,” the commission wrote in its decision.

It found her guilty on 10 of the 12 misconduct charges.

What happens next?

It will be up to Gov. Andy Beshear to fill the vacancy.

The new judge would serve until 2022 when all judges are on the ballot. Then, he or she would have to launch a campaign to be elected to an eight-year term.

Judge Tim Nolan Sentenced: The Threats, Manipulation and Ultimate Abuse Ends for the Victims, But Not Their Pain.

An ex-judge Timothy Nolan, 71, was sentenced Friday to 20 years in prison for human trafficking case. A former Campbell County District Court judge, was sentenced in front of several victims.

Kentucky Judge’s Behavior Questioned by Appellate Circuit

The Kentucky Court of Appeals remanded a case back to Greenup County Circuit Court, citing Supreme Court Justice-Elect Bob Conley’s behavior.

Attorney Who Called Himself “Mr Social Security” Paid Kickbacks to Judges and Doctors and Cost the TaxPayers Over $550 Million in Lifetime Benefit Payments is Sentenced

Conn was originally charged in April 2016, along with Daugherty and Adkins, in an 18-count indictment with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and other related offenses in connection with the disability fraud scheme.  Conn subsequently pleaded guilty on March 24, 2017, to a two-count information charging him with theft of government money and paying illegal gratuities, and he was sentenced in absentia on July 14, 2017 to 12 years in prison on those charges.

Dawn Gentry Has Her Black Robe Removed by Order of the Judicial Committee and the Kentucky Supreme Court Affirms
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