Laws In Texas

Appellate Judges Rule for Houston Fire as they Extinguish City Claims

The City argued that the remedial provision in section 174.252 of the Texas Local Govt Code is unconstitutional. That flame was extinguished.

Texas Court of Appeals tell Houston Mayor ‘NO’ in legal dispute with firefighters

While the ruling upholds union bargaining rights, the larger and more immediate effect is that a judge will now set wages for firefighters all the way back to 2017.

MAY 4, 2021 | REPUBLISHED BY LIT: MAY 5, 2021

Judges with the Texas Court of Appeals sided with Houston firefighters in a decision that could cost city taxpayers millions.

In a long running battle over Houston firefighters’ salaries, the city of Houston tried to have their collective bargaining rights declared unconstitutional. It would have been a blow to both the firefighters and all unionized employees in Texas.

In a decision announced Thursday morning, the 14th Court of Appeals told the city no.

While the ruling upholds union bargaining rights, the larger and more immediate effect is that a judge will now set wages for Houston firefighters all the way back to 2017. Texas law permits that when unions and cities can’t agree on a contract. In this case, it would affect not only 2017 wages, but every year since then.

Based on salaries when the case was filed, every 1% increase would be more than $3.25 million per year in back wages alone. Firefighters were seeking far more than just 1%. A union expert suggested Houston firefighters could be as much as 50% underpaid which would be $162.5 million for one year alone. Thursday’s decision could affect four years of back pay.

In a statement, HPFFA President Marty Lancton said, “We are grateful for this ruling. It should be a signal for the mayor to end the vindictive, taxpayer-funded legal campaign against Houston firefighters and our families. This ruling provides the city with an opportunity to reverse course and resolve our disputes.”

No new negotiations are scheduled, neither is a date to resume the wage trial. Instead, the city is considering an appeal.

“The city respectfully disagrees with today’s opinion that lets a trial court decide pay and benefits under a comparable pay standard never negotiated between the parties,” Attorney Arturo Michel with the city of Houston told ABC13 in a statement.

“The city is evaluating its options, and will decide in due time whether to ask the Texas Supreme Court to address this matter or present evidence to the trial court in support of just, fair, and affordable compensation to Houston’s Firefighters. The city has continually been, and remains, committed to negotiating in good faith with the Union.”

A ruling on Prop B, the ballot measure that would raise firefighter salaries in line with police salaries, is still pending in front of the same court. A ruling in that case could come at any time.

It’s Taken Near Six Months for the Embers to Cool Enough So A Judicial Slap Rather than a Felony Charge Can Be Mandated.

Texas being Texas. We nailed it again when LIT announced; It all tastes like fudge from here. The corruption in Texas is a wildfire and needs a special team of firefighters to take Texas back under control.

Justice by Hecht in The Judge “Fireman” Case Eventually Assigned to Special Prosecutor

Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Nathan Hecht assigns case to Judge Peebles. He assigned a special prosecutor. It all tastes like fudge from here.

Texas Judge Driven by Cops to Birthday Bash in Official Fireman’s Uniform During Pandemic Lockdown Faces Justice by Hecht

Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Nathan Hecht received the complaint after multiple judges recused themselves from the Judge Bill Gravell investigation.

Appellate Judges Rule for Houston Fire as they Extinguish City Claims
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Laws In Texas is a blog about the Financial Crisis and how the banks and government are colluding against the citizens and homeowners of the State of Texas and relying on a system of #FakeDocs and post-crisis legal precedents, specially created by the Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit to foreclose on homeowners around this great State. We are not lawyers. We do not offer legal advice. We are citizens of the State of Texas who have spent a decade in the court system in Texas and have been party to during this period to the good, the bad and the very ugly.

Donate to LawsInTexas. Make a Difference.

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

We keep your data private and share your data only with third parties that make this service possible. See our Privacy Policy for more information.

© 2020-21 LawInTexas com is an online trading name which is wholly owned by Blogger Inc., a nonprofit 501(c)(3) registered in Delaware. | All Rights Reserved.

To Top